Monthly Perspectives - May 2020

May 2020

SMART TIP:

Last month, the CDC gave an official recommendation of wearing cloth facial coverings (masks) over your face and mouth, if you must leave your home, in order to slow the spread of COVID-19.

What Foods Should You Keep on Hand During Quarantine?

The most versatile, healthful foods you can keep on hand and get the most out of during quarantine.

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WHO SAID IT?

“Truth is the proper & sufficient antagonist to error.”

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When Plans Change

Almost 50% of people leave the workforce earlier than planned.

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TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE:

Q:  According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (as of 2018, the most recent survey), how many nursing jobs are there in America?  

    1. 4,072,700
    2. 1,228,000
    3. 3,059,800
    4. 2,748,60

     
    [GET THE ANSWER]

Is Handshaking “Canceled”? 

Is the tradition over?

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Recipe of the Month

Hummus

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What Foods Should You Keep on Hand During Quarantine?

Many Americans facing long periods of COVID-19 quarantine have done their best to stockpile food and supplies. With many sequestered for weeks at a time as well as the possibility of more quarantines down the line, some are looking for ways to get the most out of their grocery pickups or deliveries. Now might be a good time to explore healthier options, as opposed to prepared meals with large quantities of salt and fat. (They taste great, but they might not be as satisfying, leaving you to want to eat more.) If you are planning a meal, consider cooking extra portions of soup or stew, suitable for freezing so you can have a quick option for lunch or quick meals for days to come. The freezer is a great resource for your quarantine pantry. You can have frozen vegetables and fruits. While you might have meat on your mind, you might get more protein from beans. Canned beans can be a versatile food, and you can make your meals go a long way through meals like chili or red beans and rice. Not only that, but canned beans offer a quicker cooking option than dry legumes. (1)

When Plans Change

Nearly half of Americans leave the workforce earlier than they had planned. Those preparing to retire continue to report an expected median retirement age of 65, yet actual retirees say that they retired at a median age of 62. A recent Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) survey has consistently found that 43% of retirees leave the workforce earlier than planned, with 35% citing illness or disability as the reason and 35% retiring because of workplace changes. In keeping with their income expectations, 80% of workers expect to work for pay in retirement, while only 28% of retirees report that they have actually done this. Why do so few work during retirement, despite their intentions? Some of it is down to those health issues mentioned earlier. Others simply don’t find themselves with the energy or desire to continue working. Those approaching retirement age with these ambitions should strategize to anticipate either possibility, offering them the most flexibility during their golden years. (2)

Is Handshaking “Canceled”?

In the wake of COVID-19, many have speculated about how life in the United States will be changed in the long term. One long-standing tradition might well be going the way of the buggy whip. The handshake, a staple of friendly interaction for business and intrapersonal communication, is being cited as a potential communicator of diseases, from ordinary colds and influenza to the current malady. No less an authority than Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has come out against the practice. “I don’t think we should ever shake hands ever again, to be honest with you. Not only would [ending handshakes] be good to prevent coronavirus disease, it probably would decrease instances of influenza dramatically in this country.” While you’re probably not shaking many hands while social distancing, regular handwashing can be an effective deterrent to contagious diseases, including COVID-19. (3)

Recipe of the Month

Hummus

Serves: 2 to 4

Ingredients:

  • One 15-oz. can of garbanzo beans (chickpeas), drained
  • ¼ cup of extra virgin olive oil
  • ¼ cup of lime juice
  • 2 Tbsp. tahini
  • 1 (or more, to taste) peeled clove of garlic, or equivalent minced garlic
  • ¼ tsp. cumin
  • 1 tsp. cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp. paprika

Directions:

  1. Combine all ingredients, apart from spices, into blender; blend until smooth.
  2. Add spices and blend until evenly distributed.

Looking for a smoother consistency? Add a tablespoon of water and blend as desired. Spicier? Add more cayenne, or other spices, to taste.

Recipe adapted from allrecipes.com

Walt West may be reached at
412-847-2041 or info@westgrp.com
www.westadvisorygroup.com

WHO SAID IT?

Thomas Jefferson

TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE ANSWER:

C: 3,059,800.(4)

Investment advisory services offered through Brookstone Capital Management, LLC (BCM), a registered investment advisor. BCM and West Advisory Group are independent of each other. Insurance products and services are not offered through BCM but are offered and sold through individually licensed and appointed agents.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty.

CITATIONS.

1 – USA Today, March 29, 2020
2 – EBRI.org, April 20, 2020
3 – FOX News, April 9, 2020
4 – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, April 20, 2020